Choke Grease

Help Support :

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

TRINITY

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2020
Messages
315
Hi guys,
Any suggestions what is the best type/brand of grease to smear on choke threads.
 
Hi guys,
Any suggestions what is the best type/brand of grease to smear on choke threads.
As I always say, you don’t need any super grease anywhere on a gun as it’s not under pressure, so it’s just a bit of lubrication. What’s critical is to really clean the threads before assembly to ensure the choke sits properly. Another reason I hate changing chokes at the ground, as you can’t clean everything properly (but I accept it’s prob OK in practice). The Teague grease seems a bit sticky compared to most, which may assist with keeping chokes from coming loose.
https://www.teaguechokes.com/teague-choke-grease-10ml#description
 
Rocol Sapphire. Bit sticky/messy but if you don't change chokes it doesn't work loose. Not too spenny.
 
I am using the Tetra gun grease, once the chokes are cleaned I smear a little on the threads before refitting.
After shooting rifle for so many years I am used to cleaning after every shoot, it might be excessive but the chokes definitely won't sieze lol
 
The stuff Teague sell at a fiver for a few grammes is a blue high pressure grease , about £12 for a whopping great grease gun cartridge . Krieghoff sell little tubes of ceramic choke grease , the same money will get you big tube of ceramic brake piston grease from the car shop . My personal choice is anything that’s handy on the garage bench .
 
I use super lube which is a synthetic grease with PTFE.
 
The stuff Teague sell at a fiver for a few grammes is a blue high pressure grease , about £12 for a whopping great grease gun cartridge . Krieghoff sell little tubes of ceramic choke grease , the same money will get you big tube of ceramic brake piston grease from the car shop . My personal choice is anything that’s handy on the garage bench .
I agree. Mr Teague hasn't missed a trick with the little tubes of "special" choke grease,
I used white Lithium grease for a while but it's a bit messy
 
All l ever used on many different choke brands was just engine oil, never had any problems. Clean the threads wipe a smear of oil around the the choke and thread and firmly nip up.
 
If you clean fairly frequently, pretty much any grease will do. It becomes more critical as frequency of removal and cleaning decreases. Personally I go a between a thousand and fifteen hundred cartridges before a full cleaning of the chokes. I use ceramic based caliper grease as it holds up to high temps and stays in place. Big tube was maybe 10 Euro, and I use as much as a mouse would put on a toothbrush when I grease the chokes. When I used the white lithium grease that Beretta touts as "specifically for chokes" (at 9 euro for really small tube) it would do the opposite of what I wanted, as it looked to me as though it attracted and trapped moisture. Chokes would come out, but the grease would look rusty brown and suspect. Wouldn't leave it for longer than maybe two outings. That didn't feel right either, so cleaned the treads and chokes proper, changed to the ceramic grease and haven't looked back since.
 
Having just bought a new multichoked Miroku , which is equipped with Invector plus chokes , I’m considering using PTFE gas tape and Boss White pipe jointing compound . One of those chokes weighs about the same as five of my Teague thin wall conversions in the other two guns . More like plumbing than chokes !
 
I did use the thinnest PTFE tape for a while - It holds the chokes in well and they don't work loose but I got a bit worried about gas & crap build up.
 
If you clean fairly frequently, pretty much any grease will do. It becomes more critical as frequency of removal and cleaning decreases. Personally I go a between a thousand and fifteen hundred cartridges before a full cleaning of the chokes. I use ceramic based caliper grease as it holds up to high temps and stays in place. Big tube was maybe 10 Euro, and I use as much as a mouse would put on a toothbrush when I grease the chokes. When I used the white lithium grease that Beretta touts as "specifically for chokes" (at 9 euro for really small tube) it would do the opposite of what I wanted, as it looked to me as though it attracted and trapped moisture. Chokes would come out, but the grease would look rusty brown and suspect. Wouldn't leave it for longer than maybe two outings. That didn't feel right either, so cleaned the treads and chokes proper, changed to the ceramic grease and haven't looked back since.
Thanks for that Luke, you have high lighted the main issue with the various greases I have used, they quickly turn to a brown sludge like state. I will try some of the high temp stuff, because I suspect the high barrel temps may oxidise normal grease
 
I clean my gun after every shoot and remove the chokes, clean the threads with some kitchen roll and put a couple of drops of gun oil on the threads before replacing them. It's worked fine for me for the last 20+ years.
I may have done that too (although a little less frequently) until I started using Berettas whereupon I found I needed to use grease to prevent the chokes rattling loose
 
Same as Martin for me - Beretta chokes (and Teague & Briley aftermarket) tended to work loose hence the PTFE tape and then Rocol Sapphire.

I do not choke change so they can stay in for 500 or so and then get a clean then - I keep a eye on the extent of fouling and ensure I can easily free them.
 
Back
Top