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PP

Optically correct..

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As I am forgetful and clumsy I am not in the market to spend a whole bunch of cash on glasses, especially as I tend to leave stuff in my three separate bags for clay, pigeon and game shooting so have three sets of glasses, gloves, ears, knives etc..

l have read a lot about glasses being optically correct, firstly, how do I know if they are optically correct and secondly does it really matter as I assume the eye refocuses..

Thanks!

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Ed Lyons is your man but my understanding is that it means they have zero refractive effect. In other words your visual acuity will be exactly the same when they're on as when they're off.

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18 minutes ago, Westward said:

Ed Lyons is your man but my understanding is that it means they have zero refractive effect. In other words your visual acuity will be exactly the same when they're on as when they're off.

Great, thanks, does that mean that If when I move lenses up the image moves that they are not optically correct? Just trying to figure out a simple test.. Thanks.

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It also means wallet lightening

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25 minutes ago, chippy said:

It also means wallet lightening

Anything that is prefixed as 'shooting' always does... 'Ah, you want shooting trousers Sir.... those are three times the price!'

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13 hours ago, PP said:

Great, thanks, does that mean that If when I move lenses up the image moves that they are not optically correct? Just trying to figure out a simple test.. Thanks.

For a simple test you could print off a Snellen Chart (Goggle it) and test your acuity with glasses on and off and at different angles.

Refraction always occurs when light passes through a transparent medium which means that with a single lens the image will shift slightly. The important thing is that the amount of image shift doesn't vary when looking through different parts of the lens.

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7 hours ago, Westward said:

For a simple test you could print off a Snellen Chart (Goggle it) and test your acuity with glasses on and off and at different angles.

Refraction always occurs when light passes through a transparent medium which means that with a single lens the image will shift slightly. The important thing is that the amount of image shift doesn't vary when looking through different parts of the lens.

Brilliant, thanks!

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