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I'm new to the sport and I've been doing some research of course and just want to check I'm on the right path here, so I'm going to throw a few statements out below and if someone can let me know if it's correct or not that'd be great. I want to take sporting seriously, just want to make sure I start on the right base and build on a good foundation. 

 

  • The difference between shot sizes, eg. a 7.5 to a 9 is that there are more pellets in a 9 shot, and they are better for shorter range targets?
  • The 'optimum' all round cartridge for sporting tends to be a 7.5 in general?
  • The best option is to take a selection of shot sizes, and use the 9's for close bits, and the 7.5/8 for longer range?
  • Without taking it too seriously and changing chokes at multiple stands, the most all round option tends to be 1/4 and 1/2 chokes. 
  • All of this stuff is trivial and the real improvements come from practice and lessons?
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Jonny English
16 minutes ago, left said:

I'm new to the sport and I've been doing some research of course and just want to check I'm on the right path here, so I'm going to throw a few statements out below and if someone can let me know if it's correct or not that'd be great. I want to take sporting seriously, just want to make sure I start on the right base and build on a good foundation. 

 

  • The difference between shot sizes, eg. a 7.5 to a 9 is that there are more pellets in a 9 shot, and they are better for shorter range targets?
  • The 'optimum' all round cartridge for sporting tends to be a 7.5 in general?
  • The best option is to take a selection of shot sizes, and use the 9's for close bits, and the 7.5/8 for longer range?
  • Without taking it too seriously and changing chokes at multiple stands, the most all round option tends to be 1/4 and 1/2 chokes. 
  • All of this stuff is trivial and the real improvements come from practice and lessons?

Yeah that's pretty much it. I wouldn't bother too much changing shot sizes in a round early on in your journey, it can bend your head at times. Fill your bag with some cheap 7.5 or 8's they'll do everything. Shooting well can be helped by removing variables from inbetween the ears. 

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Doctor Lecter
2 hours ago, left said:

I'm new to the sport and I've been doing some research of course and just want to check I'm on the right path here, so I'm going to throw a few statements out below and if someone can let me know if it's correct or not that'd be great. I want to take sporting seriously, just want to make sure I start on the right base and build on a good foundation. 

 

  • The difference between shot sizes, eg. a 7.5 to a 9 is that there are more pellets in a 9 shot, and they are better for shorter range targets?
  • The 'optimum' all round cartridge for sporting tends to be a 7.5 in general?
  • The best option is to take a selection of shot sizes, and use the 9's for close bits, and the 7.5/8 for longer range?
  • Without taking it too seriously and changing chokes at multiple stands, the most all round option tends to be 1/4 and 1/2 chokes. 
  • All of this stuff is trivial and the real improvements come from practice and lessons?

good gun fit   is crucial  and  a few lessons   early on  can pay dividends   long-term   !!  

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Hamster
2 hours ago, left said:

I'm new to the sport and I've been doing some research of course and just want to check I'm on the right path here, so I'm going to throw a few statements out below and if someone can let me know if it's correct or not that'd be great. I want to take sporting seriously, just want to make sure I start on the right base and build on a good foundation. 

 

  • The difference between shot sizes, eg. a 7.5 to a 9 is that there are more pellets in a 9 shot, and they are better for shorter range targets?
  • The 'optimum' all round cartridge for sporting tends to be a 7.5 in general?
  • The best option is to take a selection of shot sizes, and use the 9's for close bits, and the 7.5/8 for longer range?
  • Without taking it too seriously and changing chokes at multiple stands, the most all round option tends to be 1/4 and 1/2 chokes. 
  • All of this stuff is trivial and the real improvements come from practice and lessons?

The simplified version might go : half, 8's and practice.

 

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Will Hewland

A good basics check is to be applauded. However, it’s critical to understand that there is absolutely no substitute for practice and more practice. 99% of success comes from pointing the gun in the right place. 

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Doug Pinnegar

Personally. I leave a pair of 3/8th choke in (occasionally change to a cylinder if it's silly close) and shoot 8's at everything. If I miss I can guarantee you it's because missed, not a problem with chokes or cartridges.

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left

Just bought 1000 Fblu which only come in a 7.5, will make my next choice an 8. Using skeet and 1/4 chokes, will probably change that to 1/4 and 1/2 and just keep that setup for the time to come

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quiteman

Personally i would get a coach you might pay 30.00 pounds or more an hour but it will save you in the long run and get you shooting in the right way, better than trying to do yourself and not have input from all your friends around???

 I leave a pair of 1/4th choke in if shooting sporting at your local ground with 7.5 cartridges 

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